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Author Topic: Which camera to use?  (Read 4284 times)

archaeoman

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Which camera to use?
« on: April 07, 2014, 12:37:17 AM »
Dear all,

I will like the feedback and preferred cameras that you use with PS.
Can you recommend models and possible features that you think work best with the software?

Thabks you in advanc4.
Archaeoman

David Cockey

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Re: Which camera to use?
« Reply #1 on: April 08, 2014, 07:57:33 PM »
What type of scans do you want to do?
What type of objects?
How knowledgeable are you about photography?
What price range?
Any other uses for the camera?
Any preferences for camera manufactuer?

archaeoman

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Re: Which camera to use?
« Reply #2 on: April 08, 2014, 11:06:00 PM »
I realise the simplicity of my question by the complexity of your answer.
Therefore, I will like to elaborate.

What type of scans do you want to do?
I am a University member of staff and I will like to scan building elevations, human skeletons and small finds. Perhaps in the future will tackle aerial photography but this is not an issue at the moment.

What type of objects?
The objects will be figurines, pottery and possibly stone tools.

How knowledgeable are you about photography?
I have been using SLR cameras for work. I will rate myself as not afraid to use manual settings on a camera. Hey, I have even developed my photos when I was a teenager.

What price range?
?1000 plus allowance for a 35mm lens

Any other uses for the camera?
Perhaps landscape

Any preferences for camera manufactuer?
Canon, Nikon, Olympus, Leica

Thank you for taking the time in helping me. :)


Jack_in_CO

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Re: Which camera to use?
« Reply #3 on: April 12, 2014, 12:13:43 AM »
Hi,

Camera depends on sensor size.... Work purchased for my use a Nikon D800 with an f/1.8 28mm lens. This one has a full sensor and is up there as cameras go ($$$).  I'm still in the getting used to it mode and have only begun to use it on projects. I expect to be able to achieve sub-mm scale resolution on the near-range projects, such as the ones you listed. I too have considerations for taking aerial images in the near future; this is the camera for that based on speed, image size/mpixels, and the associated lens.

In the past, I have used a Nikon D90 which has a 3/4 size sensor (and a 24 mm lens) and have gotten great results with 0.5 mm scale resolution on near-range photogrammetry projects. I've also used a Nikon D40x which has the reduced sensor and have good results, but have not compared them to subsequent sets with a better camera.  Reconstruction errors are a bit higher on the D40x then the others.

I shoot (as was recommended by others smarter then me) with aperture priority setting and with the manual focus setting, then lock it off (with painters tape) to maintain uniform distance to the subject. I use the built-in focus sensor to know when it is good to trigger the shutter.

Marcel

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Re: Which camera to use?
« Reply #4 on: April 12, 2014, 10:26:36 AM »
I shoot (..) with the manual focus setting, then lock it off (with painters tape) to maintain uniform distance to the subject. I use the built-in focus sensor to know when it is good to trigger the shutter.

That's interesting, I will try that. I assume you shoot handheld? Do you have issues with misfocused images?

Thanks for sharing!

David Cockey

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Re: Which camera to use?
« Reply #5 on: April 13, 2014, 12:03:34 AM »
I shoot (as was recommended by others smarter then me) with aperture priority setting and with the manual focus setting, then lock it off (with painters tape) to maintain uniform distance to the subject. I use the built-in focus sensor to know when it is good to trigger the shutter.

I use a Canon T1i/500D DSLR with a variety of lenses ranging from a 10mm-22mm zoom lens to a 60mm macro lens. Lens choice generally depends on the amount of space available, and shape and size of the object.

I usually use manual exposure setting mode. I set the exposure based on the camera's display, take a few test shots, and look at the 3-color histogram on the camera to check that the subject is not being washed out or severely under-exposed.

I usually use "Live View" mode with the mirror up. I use auto-focus to set the camera with the focus point at the median distance from the camera to the subject. I then turn autofocus off and usually use a piece a blue painters tape to keep the focus from shifting. I use a tripod the majority of the time but also hand hold, and am careful to set the camera at the distance from the object which I set the focus for. I frequently take several groups of photos, each at a different focus distance. I sometimes use multiple focal lengths for the same subject. In PhotoScan I use Tools: Camera Calibration to create a separate group for each focal length and focus distance combination.

As long as I'm careful to keep the distance between the camera and the object the same as the distance I focused at I don't have any problems with out-of-focus photos.

The effective distance from the lens to sensor and image magnification changes each time the focus distance changes. This can affect lens/camera calibration which is why I don't refocus for each photo, and why I create a separate group for each focal length and focus distance combination.

Jack_in_CO

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Re: Which camera to use?
« Reply #6 on: April 16, 2014, 01:56:28 AM »
That's interesting, I will try that. I assume you shoot handheld? Do you have issues with misfocused images?

Thanks for sharing!

David's answer is quite good and pretty much what I would have said, if I was as eloquent with my wording.