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Author Topic: Matterport (interior scanning)  (Read 8041 times)

Breezz

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Matterport (interior scanning)
« on: May 28, 2014, 12:34:52 PM »
Hi,
I was searching for some information about interior scanning. The most well-known product on the market seems to be the Matterport. I first tought it was a cheap laserscanner but I think it only uses camera's, and no laser distances (?).
Shouldn't it be possible to achieve the same with photoscan? The matterport has 2 (or maybe more?) camera's with a fixes distance.

If you would build a DIY setup with 2 DSLR camera's next to each other, put them in the middle of a room on a tripod and let it rotate. Would photoscan be able to make a nice mesh? Beceause you have 2 camera's you have every point seen from 2 positions so ..

The same with the microsoft kinect scanners. They work quite well for room scanning.. should photoscan be able to do this with the right setup??

Here's the matterport website: http://matterport.com/

Marcel

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Re: Matterport (interior scanning)
« Reply #1 on: May 28, 2014, 03:07:13 PM »
Photoscan needs a change in position to work well, simply rotating the camera won't be enough (even with two cameras). Check the online manual, there is a schematic that shows you how to shoot interiors. (basically you move along the walls while shooting the opposite wall).

JMR

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Re: Matterport (interior scanning)
« Reply #2 on: May 28, 2014, 08:47:31 PM »
As far as I know, the working principle of Matterport as well as Kinect, is structured light scanning. It is quite a simple ranging method based on triangles with known baseline and two angles, but their accuracy degrades very fast as distance to object increases.
It has a lot to do with photogrammetry and Photoscan fundamentals. Here a structured infrared pattern is projected onto object surfaces playing a similar role of the object's texture we exploit in Photoscan. The relative orientation between camera(s) and projector is fixed and well known, as it is camera lens intrinsic parameters, so there is no need for camera calibration nor ground control to solve a single shot.
The advantages are:
  • it is an active sensor (no need for external illumination to get 3D)
  • is non dependent on object's texture
  • 3D from one single point of view (just apparently)
  • Fast! very fast!
The disadvantages are:
  • Bad accuracy and poor resolution at long range
  • poor color rendition
  • frame stitching on the fly, not easy to access raw data to improve alignment or use image-picked ground control


FoodMan

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Re: Matterport (interior scanning)
« Reply #3 on: May 29, 2014, 10:42:56 AM »
maybe I am wrong, but I don't think you could scan a modern fully furnished interior with pscan.. look all the walls and reflective surfaces... Pscan would fail because there is no texture info to work with..

... unless you can maybe project a pattern on all the walls... well not really practical..

f/

bigben

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Re: Matterport (interior scanning)
« Reply #4 on: May 29, 2014, 11:52:07 AM »
maybe I am wrong, but I don't think you could scan a modern fully furnished interior with pscan.. look all the walls and reflective surfaces... Pscan would fail because there is no texture info to work with..

... unless you can maybe project a pattern on all the walls... well not really practical..

f/
Sorry, couldn't resist. http://www.walmart.com/ip/As-Seen-on-TV-Pillow-Pet-Dream-Lites-Rainbow-Unicorn/21637868

Structured light scanners have issues with reflective surfaces too, but are good flor blank walls and table tops etc.. But then a hole in a flat surface is relatively easy to fill. The trade offs between speed and resolution make the practical uses of each method very different

James

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Re: Matterport (interior scanning)
« Reply #5 on: May 29, 2014, 01:23:43 PM »
Sorry, couldn't resist. http://www.walmart.com/ip/As-Seen-on-TV-Pillow-Pet-Dream-Lites-Rainbow-Unicorn/21637868

All that money I wasted on a light blaster! (Still haven't used it yet though!)

FoodMan

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Re: Matterport (interior scanning)
« Reply #6 on: May 29, 2014, 01:54:17 PM »
maybe I am wrong, but I don't think you could scan a modern fully furnished interior with pscan.. look all the walls and reflective surfaces... Pscan would fail because there is no texture info to work with..

... unless you can maybe project a pattern on all the walls... well not really practical..

f/
Sorry, couldn't resist. http://www.walmart.com/ip/As-Seen-on-TV-Pillow-Pet-Dream-Lites-Rainbow-Unicorn/21637868

Structured light scanners have issues with reflective surfaces too, but are good flor blank walls and table tops etc.. But then a hole in a flat surface is relatively easy to fill. The trade offs between speed and resolution make the practical uses of each method very different

he he good one..  :P 8)