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Author Topic: Using a GoPro & Photoscan  (Read 16782 times)

bigben

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Re: Using a GoPro & Photoscan
« Reply #15 on: February 04, 2015, 10:20:19 AM »

I'd really like to see a comparison of the same subject photographed with an iphone, a GoPro, a point-and-shoot, and a DSLR, and then all processed in Photoscan.  ;D
maybe I'll get around to that sometime.

I think it would be a useful comparison to have as well.  I'll try and set aside some time to include some extra images in some of my upcoming tests.  I have enough parts to start testing a pole mounted camera. Itching to go big though as I'm getting tired of little tests.  At some point I'll need to do some comparisons like this as I'm looking at options for mixing camera/lens combinations to make the best of aerial and ground based photography to see what's practical and what's not.

MortarArt

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Re: Using a GoPro & Photoscan
« Reply #16 on: February 05, 2015, 04:32:13 AM »
My big issue with the purported advantages of a GoPro and an aerial platform is how close you need to get, in order to get the necessary pixel density (taking into account FOV and sensor size). If I wanted to replicate some of the results I've gotten with my NX-1100; https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ii6i0XBAzZw I would've needed to fly within less than 20cm of the object.

As it stood the scan you see had me circling the object at a lazy 4-5m, plenty of distance for safety ... and to be honest, the shots weren't anywhere near as good as they could've been.

MiguelVarela

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Re: Using a GoPro & Photoscan
« Reply #17 on: February 05, 2015, 02:41:48 PM »
"If you're using a GoPro on a Phantom, which seems pretty common these days, keep in mind that you can mount mirrorless dslrs on them too, and get much better results."

MortarArt, I which I could do that, but where do you get a Gimbal for those cameras that fits the Phantom? Even if you find a universal Gimbal it would be a fixed one right? no in flight adjustments...

sherryamber

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Re: Using a GoPro & Photoscan
« Reply #18 on: February 22, 2019, 09:50:37 AM »
GoPro lenses are known for their clear image quality combined with a slight fisheye effect. If you don't like to distort things, especially on the sides of the image, so that more things are suitable for shooting. You can turn it off. Or use software to remove fisheye effects in later editing. Another thing I want to add is that if you want to take a more stable picture, you can use camera gimbal . It makes the picture more stable and the sound clearer.   
« Last Edit: February 25, 2019, 04:22:29 AM by sherryamber »

Dave Martin

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Re: Using a GoPro & Photoscan
« Reply #19 on: February 22, 2019, 11:43:13 AM »
Just a tip: You might find a lens profile for the gopro for lightroom. You can then back process the images there and give photoscan the corrected images.

This is absolutely what is not recommended. If you really have to, you can use an external tool to adjust the WB or other tonal/exposure levels. BUT adjusting the geometry before using PhotoScan/MetaShape (or any other SfM software) will give inferior results.