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Author Topic: Simple studio set up for scanning old tools like hammers and chisels  (Read 5195 times)

lvennard

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 Simple studio set up for scanning old tools like hammers and chisels
I tried doing some tests by putting the tool on an evenly lit table and doing a walkaround and it didn't come out very well .. the tools are old and rusty
I'm thinking i should get a turn table and shoot it rotating in a nice white studio cove? somehow mounting it so it stays upright?
 the camera equipment i have... 5D t2I and canon s100

any suggestion?
im new to photoscaning thanks

Kiesel

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Re: Simple studio set up for scanning old tools like hammers and chisels
« Reply #1 on: October 03, 2014, 03:46:35 PM »
At first, these are objects that should work very well.  :)

Some hints for the beginning:
The object should fill your photo as much as possible.
You haven't to shot the hole object in every photo.
The photo quality should be as high as possible with good lighting. ( remember "trash in - trash out")
Lift your object a little bit above the ground/table so you can separate it later from the ground more easily.
You can put a good textured thing under your object (for example a newspaper or a cork plate) to help the aligning process (later it can be erased or masked out).

You could find further help for example in the just discussed topic
http://www.agisoft.com/forum/index.php?topic=2909.0 there is also a link to a very detailed tutorial, in the manual (I know, how reads manuals?  ;) ), other tutorials or search the forum.

Hope it helps a little bit to start.

Karsten

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Re: Simple studio set up for scanning old tools like hammers and chisels
« Reply #2 on: October 03, 2014, 03:46:47 PM »
Piece of cake. Grab a cheap continuous lighting rig from ebay, with a light tent. Find a nice turntable, and make 3 spikes, with fine tips. Should be about $120 all up.

Balance the tool on the spikes so that it's raised above the turntable. The spikes make it easy to clean away the turntable and any other surfaces. They also allow you to shoot from underneath if needed.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H5ARiMFQvq0

The pegmatite sample uses this technique.

lvennard

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Re: Simple studio set up for scanning old tools like hammers and chisels
« Reply #3 on: October 03, 2014, 04:51:38 PM »
Thanks guys...
any advice on shooting patterns? 
i had better luck with my Iphone than my 5D! also how would you incorporate high contrast material like newspaper something to help the alignment?
i attached a proposed rig.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/20-20x20-Photo-Studio-Shooting-Box-Tent-Light-Softbox-Kit-4-Backdrops-/131308989961

DCK

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Re: Simple studio set up for scanning old tools like hammers and chisels
« Reply #4 on: October 03, 2014, 07:31:46 PM »
I doubt you'd need the newspaper to photograph the hammer. It appears to be distinct enough.

Square Perfect makes good, cheap light tents. Take a moment to find an online video about how to fold them up when you're finished. It's a bit non-obvious.

Virtually any TV turntable will do. Get one with a matted finish however. If you want to use newspaper for alignment, tape the newspaper to the turntable.

lvennard

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Re: Simple studio set up for scanning old tools like hammers and chisels
« Reply #5 on: October 03, 2014, 08:01:36 PM »
any thoughts on lenze or shooting pattern ? or just figure it out...?

DCK

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Re: Simple studio set up for scanning old tools like hammers and chisels
« Reply #6 on: October 03, 2014, 09:05:40 PM »
Long, narrow objects can be a little tricky. You want as many pixels per image as possible devoted to the object (as opposed to the background), and if possible, you want the whole object in focus.

One way to maximize object-pixels per image is this: Stand the object up vertically on the turntable by placing it on some plasticine clay, or in a sandbox, with the long axis of the object directly over the center of the turntable (so that the object rotates around the center of the long axis). Take pictures in "portrait" rather than "landscape" view. This fills as much of the frame as possible with your object.

Alternatively, you can shoot the object in parts, process these parts in "chunks," and then align and merge the chunks.

For the hammer, I think you can do just fine with the first approach.

The attached screenshot will give you an idea for shooting pattern. If you look closely, you can see 4 rotations around the object. The top two rotations are shot with the object resting on its base. The bottom two rotations are shot with the object resting on its distal end. So, after two rotations, I turn the object over. You should do the same. Probably the most proximal and distal rotations should be higher and lower, respectively, than what you see here, in order to get better coverage of the ends; in addition, note that these proximal and distal rotations have fewer images than the two more central rotations. That's just for efficiency. For something like your hammer you ought to be able to get away with about the same approach.

I bet three rotations is sufficient. One at the midpoint of the long axis. Two at the extremes, with coverage of the ends.

Any basic lens should be sufficient. If you're having problems with glare, for example from lacquer or because the metal is shiny, tend to your lighting or consider buying a circular polarizing filter for your lens. They're cheap.